Home  |   Schedule  |   Classes  |  Problem Sets  |   Quizzes/Exams   |   e-Mail

 Biostatistics 140.622
 Statistical Methods in Public Health II

  Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

 
Announcements Complete Syllabus

Second Term
October 27, 2014 - December 19, 2014



LECTURERS:

  • Marie Diener-West, PhD (Section 01)
    Department of Biostatistics, Hygiene E3622
    Johns Hopkins University
    Bloomberg School of Public Health 
    phone:   410-502-6894
    fax:        410-955-0958
    Office Hours: TBA and by appointment
     

  • Karen Bandeen-Roche, PhD  (Section 02)
    Department of Biostatistics, Hygiene E3527
    Johns Hopkins University
    Bloomberg School of Public Health
    phone: 410-955-3067
    fax:      410-955-0958
    Office Hours:  TBA and by appointment

goto top 


LECTURES:

10:30 am - 12 pm Tuesday, Thursday
 

  • Section 01:

 Sommer Hall  (Room E2014)

  • Section 02:    

 Sheldon Hall (Room W1214)

go to top 


LABS for review, questions, and help with the problem sets:

Lab 1:

Monday

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 2:

Tuesday

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 3:

Wednesday 

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 4:

Thursday

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 5: 

Friday

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 6:

Monday

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 7:

Tuesday

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 8:

Wednesday 

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Lab 9:

Thursday

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM 

Hygiene W3008

Note: 3:00-3:30 is open time for questions


COMPUTER LAB for STATA help:
(starting Oct 28, optional)

Monday - Friday

2:30 - 3:20 PM

Hygiene W3025

goto top


LAB INSTRUCTORS:  (Photos)

 

TEACHING ASSISTANTS:

 

  • Detian Deng
  • Youssef Farag
  • Kate Freeland
  • Mike He
  • Yuan He
  • Emily Huang
  • Zhicheng (Jason) Ji
  • Dan Jiang
  • Jeongyong Kim
  • Nee Nagarajan
  • Claire Ruberman
  • Yuting Xu
  • Chen Yue

go to top 


OFFICE HOURS for Teaching Assistants

Monday thru Friday 12:15 PM  - 1:15 PM, Hygiene W2009
goto top

LECTURE NOTES:

  • Copies of the transparencies used in the lectures are distributed weekly during class. Supplementary materials will be distributed as appropriate. Purchase of these materials is included in the registration. Copies of most materials are available for downloading in the "Classes" section of the course web site.
     

  • Version 9 or higher of Acrobat Reader is needed for opening the course materials on the website.

Download Acrobat Reader

goto top 


WEB SITE:

http://www.biostat.jhsph.edu/courses/bio622

Userid:  bio622

Password:  (given in class)

Contains course schedule, office hours, lecture notes, self-evaluation problems, Stata lecture notes, problem sets, quizzes, solution keys, and data sets. 

goto top 


AUDIO:

  • An audio lecture is available on the course website in the "Classes" section after each lecture.

goto top


TEXTBOOK:

Recommended book for which we will provide reading assignments:

  • Bernard Rosner, Fundamentals of Biostatistics, 2011, Duxbury  Press, Belmont, CA.
     

Suggested book:

  • Lawrence C. Hamilton. Statistics with Stata 12, 2013, Duxbury Press, Belmont, CA.

goto top


CALCULATOR:

Basic functions (+, -, x, ÷), logarithms and exponents, simple memory and recall, factorial key.

goto top


COMPUTING PACKAGE:

goto top


GRADING based on:

  • 5% Problem set 1 (points deducted if late)
  • 5% Problem set 2 (points deducted if late)
  • 5% Problem set 3 (points deducted if late)
  • 5% Problem set 4 (points deducted if late)

Students may work together, but must hand in their own version of the problems set -- DO NOT SUBMIT AN EXACT COPY of another student's work.

  • 5% Quiz 1 (in class)
  • 5% Quiz 2 (in class)
     
  • 35% Midterm examination (in class)
  • 35% Final examination (in class)

goto top


COURSE OBJECTIVE:

Students who successfully master this course will be able to:

1. Use statistical reasoning to formulate public health questions in quantitative terms:

(a) Distinguish the summary measures of association applicable to retrospective and prospective study designs.

(b) Distinguish between the appropriate regression models for handling continuous outcomes, binary outcomes and time-to-events.

(c) Conduct an intent-to-treat statistical analysis of data from a randomized community trial and correctly interpret the findings about the treatment efficacy.

(d) Conduct a basic analysis of data from a cohort study and correctly interpret the findings about the association between exposure and outcome.

(e) Conduct a basic analysis of data from a case-control study and correctly interpret the findings about exposure and outcome.

(f) Use stratification in design and analysis to minimize confounding and identify effect modification

2. Design and interpret graphical and tabular displays of statistical information:

(a) Use the statistical analysis package Stata to construct statistical tables and graphs of journal quality.

3. Use probability models to describe trends and random variation in public health data:

(a) Distinguish among the underlying probability distributions for modeling continuous, categorical, binary and time-to-event data.

(b) Calculate the sample size necessary for estimating either a continuous or binary outcome in a single group.

(c) Estimate the sample size necessary for determining a statistically significant difference in either a continuous or binary outcome between two groups.

(d) Recognize the assumptions required in performing statistical tests assessing relationships between an outcome and a risk factor.

4. Use statistical methods for inference, including confidence intervals and tests, to draw valid public health inferences from study data:

(a) Estimate two proportions and their difference, and confidence intervals for each. Interpret the interval estimates within a scientific context. Recognize the importance of other sources of uncertainty beyond those captured by the confidence interval

(b) Estimate an odds ratio or relative and its associated confidence interval. Explain the difference between the two and when each is appropriate.

(c) Perform and interpret one-way analysis of variance to test for differences in means among three or more populations. Evaluate whether underlying probability model assumptions are appropriate.

(d) Contrast mean outcomes among pairwise groups using multiple comparisons procedures.

(e) Interpret the correlation coefficient as a measure of the strength of a linear association between a continuous response variable and a continuous predictor variable.

(f) Perform and correctly interpret the results from a simple linear regression analysis to describe the dependence of a continuous response variable on a single predictor variable.

(g) Use data transformations such as logs and square roots so that regression model assumptions are more nearly satisfied.

(h) Perform and correctly interpret the results from a simple logistic regression analysis to describe the dependence of a dichotomous response variable on a single predictor variable.

The course is designed to enable students to develop their data analysis skills. Four important datasets will be analyzed by the students using the statistical package Stata throughout the 621-624 course sequence.

goto top 


OTHER LINKS  

goto top


  Home   |    Schedule   |    Classes    |    Problem Sets    |    Quizzes/Exams    |    e-Mail    |     TA Log 

 

www.free-counter-plus.com

 Last updated Thursday, October 30, 2014

optimized cable
Www.free-counter-plus.com

  ©2014, Department of Biostatistics,
               Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
               All Rights Reserved